The DHRX is a cross-campus faculty research network designed to highlight innovative, digitally-focused academic work at the University of Pittsburgh. Bringing together researchers from a broad range of disciplinary backgrounds, the network is dedicated to exploring the creative use of digital technologies in humanities and social science research.

Currently, a major goal of the DHRX is to help build community. The members of the network are frequently in contact with one another and the group meets as a whole once per semester to discuss issues and challenges specific to digital making.

We are enthusiastic about the ways that digital technology can expand, reconfigure, and enrich our understanding of the relationship between academic inquiry and the social world.

For further information or to find out more about joining the network, please feel free to contact Alison Langmead, Principal Contact for the DHRX at dhrx@pitt.edu.

Upcoming PGH|DH (Pittsburgh Digital Humanities) Events (Click here for full calendar)

Heather Froehlich Lecture
Starts: October 26, 2017, 4:30 pm
Ends: October 26, 2017, 6:00 pm
Location: 202 Frick Fine Arts Building
Description: In the early modern period, women were passed from father to husband, and in particular were insulted and debased by accusations of 'whore' (i.e. not chaste and not silent) when they acted out against an established social order of male empowerment. Kay Stanton, in her chapter in a Feminist Companion to Shakespeare (2010), lists and describes all the ways the word 'whore' is used to demean women in Shakespeare's plays. In this talk, I will use the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary (http://oed.com/thesaurus) to present a larger list of terms synonymous with 'whore' in use during Shakespeare's life. With a larger lexicon for feminine lack of purity, it is possible to show a better picture of how whorishness and feminine dishonour is constructed in Shakespeare's plays.
Workshop: Corpus Linguistics with AntConc
Starts: October 27, 2017, 10:00 am
Ends: October 27, 2017, 12:00 pm
Location: CFA 317, CMU
Description: Corpus analysis is a form of text analysis which allows you to make comparisons between textual objects at a large scale (so-called ‘distant reading’). This hands-on workshop explores the basic principles of quantitative text analysis using a graphical user interface. We will discuss how to use computers to identify patterns in language by covering a few basic principles of corpus methods, including keyword-in-context analysis, very basic statistics, and how computers can be used to generate more nuanced questions for a given dataset.

No previous programming experience is required or expected.
MCN Advancing Digital Transformation in Museums in Pittsburgh
Starts: November 7, 2017
Ends: November 10, 2017
Location: Museums